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Emma Roberts in Bathing Suit Says “It’s Summer Somewhere”

Emma Roberts is spending her weekend like we all should be—relaxing completely. And she’s doing it in a really nice spa. “It’s summer somewhere, right?” she captioned some photos of her in a bathing suit, one before some stone sinks and another getting what looks like a mud scrub. How does the actress and mother-of-one keep herself so fit? Read on to see 7 ways Emma Roberts stays in shape and the photos that prove they work—and to get beach-ready yourself, don’t miss these essential 30 Best-Ever Celebrity Bathing Suit Photos!

“With my diet, I do what feels good for me at the time,” Emma told Shape. “I try not to say that I won’t eat something. Instead, I stay in tune with my body and my mind, and I think, What do I feel like eating?” Make “small and simple tweaks to your food environment, nutrition selection and emotional reactions, and it will make all the difference,” says Ilana Muhlstein, M.S., R.D. in her book You Can Drop It. “There’s no one food or behavior that’s forbidden. Life will happen, treats, sweets and drinks will come up and the key is to track them….You need emotional healing, not emotional eating.”

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“I love Pilates. I feel very energized and centered when I walk out the door afterward.I tried to get into running, but it didn’t work for me. Pilates is something you take your time at, and it makes me feel very clear,” she continued. Emma trains with Nonna Gleyzer at Body by Nonna. “I can see my shape transform within a couple of sessions,” she maintains. “That’s good because I’m that person who, after one class, lifts up her shirt and says, ‘Where are my abs?’ I want results!”

Emma also works out with a trainer, Andrea Orbeck, to ensure she gets in her cardio. “Our sessions are an hour, focusing mostly on arms, abs, and ass-the all-important three A’s,” she says. One more important A: Aerobic exercise. It is known to prevent type 2 diabetes, and combining a heart-pumping cardio session with muscle-strengthening exercises is even better. A study published in the journal PLoS Medicine found that women who engaged in at least 150 minutes per week (about 20 minutes per day) of aerobic activity and at least 60 minutes per week (three 20-minute sessions) of muscle-strengthening activities reduced their risk of diabetes by 33 percent compared with inactive women.

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Emma can be found striking a pose. “I also do yoga. I usually take classes with a friend,” she says. “Yoga can help reduce risk factors for chronic diseases, such as heart disease and high blood pressure. Yoga may also help manage low back pain, neck pain and menopause symptoms. Yoga might also help relieve symptoms of several chronic conditions, such as pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, arthritis and insomnia,” says the Mayo Clinic.

“I started working out regularly when I was living in New Orleans shooting American Horror Story: Coven several years ago. I really fell in love with the food there. To counter all I was eating, I worked out more. It was a great balance: I’d have fried-chicken sliders at night and then go to my yoga class the next morning,” she reveals. 

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Emma starts her day with a juice from Moon Juice, Spirit Dust, describing it as “a fun way” to begin the morning. “I also drink iced coffee even when it’s freezing outside because hot coffee doesn’t wake me up.” If she has a day off, she will eat eggs and bacon and toast for breakfast. “I adore classic breakfast foods,” she says. “For lunch, I’ll do a chopped salad with avocado, chicken, and tomatoes. Dinner is a turkey burger, or salmon with teriyaki or ponzu sauce, and brown rice with broccoli. I need snacks, particularly when I’m working. Lately I’ve become obsessed with seaweed. And chips and guacamole make me so happy! I also love cupcakes, ice cream, and Sidecar Doughnuts. Sometimes I bring sweets for everyone at work as an excuse to eat them.”

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“Reading is my form of self-care and meditation,” she maintains. “I set aside at least 20 minutes a day for it. Sometimes that turns into 30 minutes, an hour, two hours. There are so many books on my dining room table right now that I can’t use it for eating. I go to the store and buy every book I want to read for the next few months and put them on the table.”